Archive | January, 2013

Bill would tighten CRP enrollment requirements

U.S. Representative Martha Roby (R-Alabama) recently introduced a bill that aims to limit the types of farmland that would be eligible for the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). CRP, as we know it today, was officially established as part of the 1985 Farm Bill as a program in which the government provides financial assistance to farmers and ranchers […]

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Bacon, and how it came to be

If you classify bacon as one of the world’s great treasures, I second that notion. Now, people who love their bacon … and ribs … and pork chops are  learning more about where their food comes from by taking butchering classes. Once restricted to the coasts, these classes are now offered at several locations in […]

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A break for embattled ranchers

Japan has finally listed a ban on U.S. beef imports that it put in place in 2003 in response to the “mad cow” scare. Japan was the largest importer of U.S. beef in 2003, so this is great news for American beef producers. However, as the article below points out, it is a silver lining […]

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America’s 50 most powerful people in food

‘The Daily Meal’ recently released its third annual list of the 50 most powerful people in food. The list is comprised of people from a range of sectors: farmers, agribusiness moguls, food processors and distributors, retail outlets, consumer advocates, policymakers, Hollywood-types, chefs, restauranteurs, and journalists. The best aspect of a list like this is they […]

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McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish goes sustainable

McDonald’s recently announced that its Filet-O-Fish and a new product, Fish McBites, will entirely consist of the sustainably caught Alaskan Pollack, and they definitely want the public to be aware of it. Beginning in February, McDonald’s will pay annual fees and royalties to the Marine Stewardship Council to use its “Certified Sustainable Seafood” label. The […]

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No bad apples: Grocery store cuts waste and cost by selling imperfect fruit

A small grocery chain in northern California is teaming up with an organization called FoodStar to sell “imperfect” fruit that would normally be passed over as “below grade” by many supermarkets. The parters hope that this initiative will lead to less wasted food, as well as reduce costs for grocery stores. According to the article […]

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